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Mason Jars long term opening periodically

Russ H.

Patron-Fight The Good Fight
Patron
#21
One of things I would like to chime back in on here is what I tend to do. It may be wrong-it may be right but its what I do.
I use small jars for only a very small portion of my tobaccos. My wife and I had quite the collection of clean Mason jars from canning garden veggies so lids, rings and jars--well I already had. This made putting any money into jarring pretty much a non issue for me. So--my everyday tobacco which is Boswells Preium Burley mixed with Dans Blend went into quite a few jars. What I do is label them with the date I jarred it. From there I worked backwards on using the earlier jar first. I also pack the jars tightly. I'll open up a one quart jar--take some out into a zip-lock bag and put the lid, ring back on and store it away. I keep all my jars in a cabinet away from light and temp. swings. I also wait till a nice day when its sunny--dump that bag of tobacco onto a large dinner plate and spread it out. I allow the sun to dry it slightly being careful not to let it get crispy. Back into the bag it goes and I have enough for a while.
I find that with my particular blend that the so called "aging" actually allows the flavors to mingle and marry. It actually helps some but not what I would term as some miracle experience. The flavor does not weaken, but gets better. How much better--well thats subjective.
My biggest point in all of this "aging" thing is that I mainly am concerned about preservation of the tobacco long term so it cannot go bad.
Aging is only a small concern on my end--I want quality tobacco that I can store long term without it drying out, getting moldy, and yes--we all know the price per ounce is not coming down--so I wanted to get plenty before pricing and taxes limited my ability to buy it.
Mason/canning jars are about the best one can use--simply make sure the little lip on the lids remains clean and can provide a good seal--screw the rings on without getting crazy tight and put the jar away--in a cabinet away from light and where temps do not fluctuate wildly and one can store tobacco for a very very long time. I have yet to run into issues by opening up a one quart jar--dumping some out, and reclosing it. I have not noticed any loss of quality, flavor--no mold and I have been doing this for a very long time. Jarring tobacco is a great way to preserve your blends for years to come.
 

Sir Saartan

The Tan Saarlander
Patron
#23
I'm kind of envious of you guys who get to buy bulk tobacco for cheap. In Germany, there are 50g pouches, there are tins (usually 50g or 100g) and there are a few manufacturers
that send out big old bags of tobacco. Because of tax laws, there has to be a tax band sealing anything that contains tobacco when being sold. That has to be done by the manufacturer,
which means there is no bulk sale possible here.

On the other hand, that means I don't have to think about mason jars. Usually, the tins are sealed tight enough to last you a decade or two without worries.
 

RedScot

Well-known member
#24
...then there's the whole vacuum sealed tins vs pull-ring tins thingy. I have a few jars - my cellar-building is going slowly - of blends that were originally in vacuum tins, but read that aerobic aging would be faster than anaerobic. I am still looking for an exact account of the chemical changes that make aged virginias better than fresh, but it seems to me that aging was originally only by accident, and exclusively aerobic. If that's true, then opening the jar occasionally won't hurt the aging process at all. However, if an oxygen-free environment is needed for proper aging, then opening a jar (or a vacuum tin, for that matter) would set the aging process back. Not all the way to zero, but still the process would be delayed until all the oxygen was consumed again.
 

Kuda

Well-known member
#25
There are no mold spores on new jars. Why screw around with a perfectly good new jar. Fill it up.
I agree with this in theory but when I first bought my jars and opened them still factory sealed there was definitely an off odor that I felt better having washed out. Plus it makes a fun game cuting the flakes and prepingand filling all the jars before they cool down after pulling the out of the dishwasher.
 

WalkinStick

Eventus Stultorum Magister
Sales
Patron
#26
I agree with this in theory but when I first bought my jars and opened them still factory sealed there was definitely an off odor that I felt better having washed out. Plus it makes a fun game cuting the flakes and prepingand filling all the jars before they cool down after pulling the out of the dishwasher.
If you leave the lid off, that smell dissipates after about 20 seconds. I have never washed my jars and have not had one mold yet. I’ve got stuff that’s been jarred for 6-7 years.
 

Kuda

Well-known member
#27
If you leave the lid off, that smell dissipates after about 20 seconds. I have never washed my jars and have not had one mold yet. I’ve got stuff that’s been jarred for 6-7 years.
It may just be a psychological peace of mind thing on my part because I'm sure the smell has more to do with the lids than the jars (they say not to wash them but I do that too) and the tobacco would overpower it eventually anyway. Or maybe it's just the oddness of stale air (that's how you get mummy curses you know) really off putting stuff. At any rate it hasn't hurt anything the jars still seal well and there haven't been any problems doing it this way either. Though now that I've said that, tempting fate being what it is I should probably do the semi annual visual inspection soon on the older jars.
 

WalkinStick

Eventus Stultorum Magister
Sales
Patron
#28
It may just be a psychological peace of mind thing on my part because I'm sure the smell has more to do with the lids than the jars (they say not to wash them but I do that too) and the tobacco would overpower it eventually anyway. Or maybe it's just the oddness of stale air (that's how you get mummy curses you know) really off putting stuff. At any rate it hasn't hurt anything the jars still seal well and there haven't been any problems doing it this way either. Though now that I've said that, tempting fate being what it is I should probably do the semi annual visual inspection soon on the older jars.
I figure I probably just jinxed myself anyway and now I’ll find that one of my entire totes of jars is one big walking talking mold monster.
 

mwsmoker

Smokes 'em straight
Sales
Patron
#30
Ah, but what about the differences between aerobic and anaerobic aging...?
:old:
Which do you prefer? How do you know? did you test this theory on many blends?
:lol2::naughty:
Open this can of worms is.
Exactly. Tobacco aging is a little experience, a little old wive's tales, a ton of assumption / speculation, and nearly zero science.

I’ve never seen anyone publish real information about what microbes are generally present in tinned or bulk tobacco, which are aerobic, which are anaerobic, which are beneficial, and which may be harmful.

Roll the dice and take your chances.
 

Robert Hardy

Well-known member
Sales
#31
Exactly. Tobacco aging is a little experience, a little old wive's tales, a ton of assumption / speculation, and nearly zero science.

I’ve never seen anyone publish real information about what microbes are generally present in tinned or bulk tobacco, which are aerobic, which are anaerobic, which are beneficial, and which may be harmful.

Roll the dice and take your chances.
And to add to the confusion, many of the microbes are facultative, meaning they can exist in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Many of my clamp lid jars have developed a vacuum seal which makes them difficult to open. There's something going on in there...:bigeyes2: